NU Hospitals

Subtitle

Blog

An overview of Hypospadias : Causes, Types, Surgery

Posted on March 21, 2019 at 8:00 PM

Hypospadias: 


If your baby boy is born with a dysfunctional penis or it doesn’t function the way it’s supposed to, you want to know whether he can be treated right away. And that’s understandable. Boys with Hypospadias are born with the location of the opening ranging anywhere within the head or shaft of the penis, the scrotum, or perineum.

Hypospadias is pretty common and can be left as it is but surgeons can do surgery to fix the problem when required.

What causes Hypospadias?

As with many other birth defects, this is also one of them.

Some of the reasons could be:


  • Genetics: It’s also associated with some genetic syndromes. If the boy has a father or brother were born with it, you’re also likely to get the same.
  • Fertility treatments: Some kind of hormone therapy or medicine during fertility treatment can lead to this.
  • Exposure to smoking and pesticides.
  • Premature.


Types of Hypospadias:

There are nearly three kinds, depending on where the urethra opening is located:


  • Near the head of the penis (subcoronal).
  • Along the shaft of the penis (midshaft).
  • Where the penis and scrotum meet, or on the scrotum (penescrotal).


How does the surgery work for Hypospadias?

If the location of the opening is near the tip, the penis often works well enough. But many cases of hypospadias call for surgery to move the urethra and opening. This procedure often includes straightening the penis. The motive behind this surgical correction is to create a penis that functions normally. Surgical correction should also result in a properly directed urinary stream and a straightened penis upon erection. Children who get this surgery are usually between 3 months and 18 months old. The child is anesthetized during the surgery.

Equipped with state-of-the-art facilities and some of the best paediatric urologists, NU Hospitals offers the best urology treatment in Bangalore.


Categories: Urology

Post a Comment

Oops!

Oops, you forgot something.

Oops!

The words you entered did not match the given text. Please try again.

0 Comments